OnlineMACMaster of Arts
in Counseling

OnlineMAHSMASTER OF ARTS
IN HUMAN SERVICES

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Course Description

CNS 740: Professional Orientation to Counseling

This course is an introduction to the profession of counseling. It covers the history of counseling, as well as the roles that counselors play in today’s society. It examines counseling associations and specialization areas within counseling. Professional issues such as licensure and certification of counselors are explored, too. Public policy, advocacy, and other contemporary factors that impact the present and future of counseling are looked at in context and developmentally.

While the focus of the course is on introducing the counseling profession, we know that some of you are planning on the field of human services. We want to acknowledge that the ties to that field will be less explicit, but you will be able to see the progression of helping services that will readily apply to human services.

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CNS 748: Lifespan Development Implications for Counseling

This course provides an examination of major theories of human development, including those from physical, psychological, cognitive, social, and moral perspectives. Development is viewed across the human life span in each of these areas. The course is designed to encourage an integrated concept of these theoretical perspectives, which serves as a developmental framework for the counseling process.

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CNS 741: Theories and Models of Counseling

Study of theories and approaches to professional counseling: psychoanalytic (Freud, Adler, Jung), person-centered (Rogers), existential (May, Frankl), behavioral (Skinner, Glasser), cognitive/rational (Beck, Ellis), systemic, postmodern. Professional orientation, issues, ethics, cultural pluralism, research, and trends in counseling.

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CNS 721: Research and Statistical Analysis in Counseling

This course will provide you with an overview of statistics and research in counseling. It will combine reading of the required text, journal articles and other selected publications, lectures, discussion, small group activities, and student presentations to help students learn and assimilate the key statistics and research principles necessary to successfully complete the Masters in Counseling program and practice as professional clinical mental health or school counselors.

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CNS 747: Cultures and Counseling

The course examines the influence of culture in human development and in counseling relationships. The areas of awareness, knowledge, and skills in the context of racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity will be explored in-depth

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CNS 743: Career Development in Counseling

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to career development theories, career counseling processes and techniques, career assessment tools, career development program planning, and sources of occupational information. Emphasis is placed on empirically-based career development theories, theoretically based counseling interventions, and current issues in the world of work and vocational counseling.

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CNS 742: Group Procedures in Counseling

This course is intended for students admitted to the graduate program in the Department of Counseling. It is designed to develop a basic familiarity with the theories, procedures and techniques used in the four main types of groups defined by the Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW): psychoeducational, task/work, counseling, and psychotherapy. It should provide the learner with an understanding of group processes and dynamics from both an experiential and a didactic perspective. Ethical guidelines for group practice will be emphasized, as well as exemplary practices for leading a group. Research on groups and multicultural considerations in groups will also be covered, along with developmental issues across the lifespan that pertain to groups.

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CNS 773: Family Counseling

This is a professional counseling course that surveys the field of marriage, couple and family counseling. By completing this course, students should become knowledgeable about the history, theories, and practices of marriage, couple and family counseling. Ethical, legal, and other professional issues related to marriage, couple and family counseling (e.g., identification and affiliation) will be covered, too.

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CNS 737: Basic Counseling Skills & Techniques

The overarching objective of this course is to help you develop the counseling skills necessary to create and maintain therapeutic relationships with clients. To that end, you will be provided opportunities to learn how to utilize effectively the following basic counseling skills: mirroring, non-verbal minimal encouragers, verbal minimal encouragers, invitational skills, open questions, closed questions, reflection of content (also called paraphrasing), reflection of feeling, reflection of meaning, and confrontation. As you learn how and when to utilize these skills, you will enhance your ability to develop rapport with clients, listen actively, express empathy, and motivate clients to make positive changes. This course likely differs from many courses which you have taken during your academic career; rather than being evaluated on your cognitive understanding of these counseling skills, you will be evaluated on your ability to utilize these skills effectively. The counseling skills courses, which include basic and advanced counseling skills, although not overly weighty in content, are extremely weighty in importance, as they are preparatory to your practicum experience wherein you will provide counseling services to actual clients. Although not overly arduous to understand, many of these counseling skills are difficult to apply and, thus, take practice. Please be sure to dedicate a good deal of time to practicing these skills. You will be given opportunities to practice your counseling skills in “mock” counseling sessions, referred to as triads. Each week, you will meet synchronously with two other students in your cohort to practice counseling skills. In lieu of a traditional midterm and final exam, you will turn in two mock counseling session recordings in which you demonstrate your use of the basic counseling skills.

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CNS 739: Advanced Counseling Skills & Crisis Management

This course focuses on expanding the development of your counseling skills (as begun in CNS 737), with a particular emphasis on the knowledge, skills, and awareness needed to work effectively with clients who may be in crisis. To better assist your clients in the future, this course will also place a high priority on each student’s ability to develop a greater sense of self-awareness and introspection. As a central element of counseling and specifically crisis intervention is sitting with, holding, and tolerating intense emotional experiences, this course will enhance your own ability to experience, and assist others in experiencing, a full range of human emotions.

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CNS 749: School Guidance and Counseling

This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophy of a comprehensive, developmental K-12 school-counseling program and to the ASCA national model for school counseling programs. Students will be expected to demonstrate the professional knowledge, skills, and practices necessary to promote the academic, career, and personal/social development of all K–12 students. The emphasis will be on school counseling programs as critical components of the education enterprise, the planning and management of such a program, and the skills of school counselors.

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CNS 771: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the foundations of clinical mental health counseling. You will learn about the historical and professional foundations of clinical mental health counseling, the roles and functions of clinical mental health counselors, the settings in which clinical mental health counselors practice, and the services that they provide. The course emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and the development of skills needed by contemporary clinical mental health counselors.

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CNS 738a: School Counseling Practicum

The practicum is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and personal development. In practicum, you will be provided the opportunity to increase understanding of yourself and your impact on others as well as augment your understanding of your setting (school or clinical/mental health). Practicum meetings will be composed of various experiences to be determined by the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Activities will be designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, self-awareness, and professional identity development.

The Counseling Practicum is a second semester pre-internship experience designed to help students further develop their individual counseling and group work skills under careful supervision. The Practicum includes a minimum of 200 total hours, with at least 165 hours of field experience in a community/mental health or school setting plus at least 35 hours of individual/triadic and group supervision by University faculty. The 200 hours break down as follows:
165 hours of work in a school or community setting over a period of one semester (an average of 11-12 hours per week for 15 weeks). These hours should include the following activities:
● a minimum of 65 hours of direct individual client contact, 10 hours of which must be group work
● a minimum of 7 hours of supervision by the site supervisor.
35 hours of university supervision, which includes:
● 14 hours of individual or paired supervision by a faculty member
● 21 hours of group supervision (1 1/2 hours per week) by program faculty with other students

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CNS 738b: Clinical Mental Health Practicum

The practicum is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and personal development. In practicum, you will be provided the opportunity to increase understanding of yourself and your impact on others as well as augment your understanding of your setting (school or clinical/mental health). Practicum meetings will be composed of various experiences to be determined by the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Activities will be designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, self-awareness, and professional identity development.

The Counseling Practicum is a second semester pre-internship experience designed to help students further develop their individual counseling and group work skills under careful supervision. The Practicum includes a minimum of 200 total hours, with at least 165 hours of field experience in a community/mental health or school setting plus at least 35 hours of individual/triadic and group supervision by University faculty. The 200 hours break down as follows:
165 hours of work in a school or community setting over a period of one semester (an average of 12 hours per week for 14 weeks). These hours should include the following activities:
● a minimum of 50 hours of direct individual client contact, 10 hours of which must be group work
● a minimum of 7 hours of supervision by the site supervisor.
35 hours of university supervision, which includes:
● 14 hours of individual or paired supervision by a faculty member
● 21 hours of group supervision (1 1/2 hours per week) by program faculty with other students

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CNS 753: Human Services Program Planning and Management

The overarching purpose of CNS 753: Human Services Program Planning and Evaluation is to help master’s level human service students develop their administrative and leadership abilities by increasing their knowledge and skills related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of human service programs. Specifically, the course will address contemporary issue in human service program planning, such as the importance of accountability and the need to consider diverse populations in all phases of program development. The course will also cover the importance of, and best practices in, problem analysis, needs assessment, program design, program implementation, program evaluation, and budgeting. Along with learning about program planning models and conceptual theories, students will have opportunities to apply their knowledge of program planning by identifying and describing a current social problem related to human services, developing a needs assessment to better understand the social problem, and proposing a program to address the identified social problem that includes a plan for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the program.

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CNS 786: Consultation and Program Development in Counseling

This course will provide you with an overview of consultation and collaboration theory and process. Students will gain a foundation for facilitating change in human systems, as well as consultation with families, schools, colleges, and community agencies. This course will utilize reading from the required textbook, journal articles and other selected publications, lectures, discussion, and various activities to help students learn and apply the basics of consultation and collaboration to professional practice.

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CNS 752: Human Services Administration

Welcome to CNS 752: Human Services Administration. This course focuses on key elements associated with managing human services delivery programs. In particular, it will cover the following topics: challenges associated with managing human services programs, environmental factors that influence human services delivery programs, theories associated with organizational management, organizational design, contract and grant negotiation, administrative supervision, financial management, information systems management, and legal/regulatory issues. This course will also review content covered in CNS 753, including needs assessment, budgeting, and program evaluation.

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CNS 770: Classification of Mental Disorders

This course will provide students with an overview of brain structure and function, normal and abnormal personality, the DSM-5 classification and description of mental health disorders, an introduction to the ICD classification of mental health disorders, psychopharmacology, and common medical illnesses and medications/drugs that cause mental health symptoms. In addition, a framework for treatment planning will be provided along with treatment planning for common mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and PTSD, among others. It will combine reading of the required texts, elective books, journal articles and other selected publications, lectures, discussions, small group activities, student presentations, and use of various audiovisual media to help students learn and assimilate the key principles in the described areas of instruction necessary to successfully complete the Masters in Counseling program and practice as a professional mental health or school counselor.

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CNS 746: Counseling Children

This course explores theory, techniques and issues to provide specialized knowledge and skills training in counseling children and adolescents. Students will learn to assess behavior and incorporate developmentally, ethnically, legally, and gender appropriate strategies and techniques to meet the needs of counseling children and adolescents. Students will examine various theoretical, behavioral, and play therapy techniques for counseling children and adolescents.

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CNS 780: Professional, Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling

This course highlights pertinent topics in the law and ethics related to the practice of counseling. You will be introduced to an overview and relevant guidelines in these areas. Hopefully your study will inspire you to take an active role in developing and monitoring your competence as a counselor, and demystify some of the legal and ethical issues that can feel most intimidating to counselors. The overarching goal is to help you to be a knowledgeable, careful counselor who always protects the clients or students with whom you work. In this course you will continue to build upon and grapple with some of the issues that you have learned about regarding competent, ethical, and legal practice in your previous coursework.

You will have the opportunity to examine client rights and responsibilities as well as your role and duties in that area. We will explore a variety of topics including but not limited to: professional boundaries, record-keeping and documentation, confidentiality and its limits, responding to subpoenas, malpractice and negligence, informed consent, and counselor competence.

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CNS 744a: School Counseling Internship I

Internship is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and professional development. In internship, you will have opportunities to practice school counseling. Internship supervision meetings will be related to the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Activities will be designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, application of school counseling job responsibilities, self-awareness, and professional identity development.

You will take two counseling internship courses (CNS 744 and 745) that together total a minimum of 600 hours of experience in a school site and 42 hours of group supervision with your colleagues and a university supervisor. Internships are completed following the successful completion of the Counseling Practicum. Each semester’s experience includes the following:

  • 300 hours of work in a school setting over a period of one semester (an average of 21 hours per week for 14 weeks) and should include
  • 120 hours of direct service with clients and
  • 14 hours of individual supervision by the site supervisor and
  • 21 hours of group supervision (1 ½ hours/week) by program faculty with other students
  • 321 hours minimum
    Work in schools as an intern counselor and satisfactorily complete the following requirements:

  1. Complete 300 hours internship per semester (600/year) with 120 direct service clock hours each semester (24/year)
  2. Participate in all activities as requested by your site supervisor in a timely, complete manner
  3. Become familiar with and follow all state/county/school policies
  4. Maintain current professional liability insurance. Have documentation on file with the Wake counseling department.
  5. Adhere to ethical standards as outlined by the American Counseling Association and the American School Counseling Association. Read with your on-site supervisor and sign the ethical standards guidelines; submit the copy with all signatures to your program faculty.
  6. Obtain supervision from site supervisor and/or university supervisor immediately if you become aware of any information that would cause you to be concerned for anyone’s safety. Inform both supervisors without delay.

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CNS 744b: Clinical Mental Health Internship I

The 2016 Standards of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) indicates the need for a comprehensive clinical experience in which students learn strategies to effectively provide services to a diverse population of clients. The internship provides students the opportunity to synthesize and utilize the theoretical, empirical, clinical, and professional knowledge that you have gained thus far in the program.

Internship is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and professional development. At your site, you will engage in the practice of clinical mental health counseling. Internship group supervision meetings will be based upon the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Group and individual supervision are designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, application of counselor job responsibilities, self-awareness, and professional identity development. The internship experience is intended to reflect the comprehensive work experience of a professional clinical mental health counselor. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss his or her needs and the course expectations with his/her site supervisor and university supervisor to gain the most from the internship experience.

You will complete clinical mental health counseling internship courses that together total a minimum of 600 hours of experience at a clinical mental health counseling site. During these courses, you will participate in weekly supervision at your site, as well as with your university colleagues and supervisor. Review this syllabus carefully for specifics about requirements. Remember that direct and indirect hours at your site suggest a time-based requirement, but merely completing these hours will not meet the expectations for this course; counseling students must develop clinically, professionally, and personally in order to fulfill the requirements for internship.

As a counseling student you are responsible for your own experience and learning. At this point in your training, it is expected that you engage in regular self-assessment. Thus, as part of the supervision process, you will have many opportunities to share and learn from both your struggles and your triumphs. Open communication is crucial. In fact, it is your ethical responsibility to assess your needs and ask for help when you need it. In internship, as well as across your career as a counselor, you will most certainly encounter many challenges. It is important that you bring those challenges and struggles into supervision. Consider this as you select cases and recordings to present, transcribe, and review. When it comes to asking for what you need, be courageous in your willingness to reach out for help. Your faculty, supervisors, and peers are here to help you thrive.

You are a valued member of this learning community. We look forward to learning together this semester.

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CNS 754: Human Services Field Experience

Welcome to CNS 754: Human Services Field Experience. During this 14-week course, you will volunteer at a human services site in your area for a minimum of 350 hours. Specifically, you will be required to spend 329 hours of supervised experience at an approved site. This experience should include a minimum of 14 hours of supervision by the site mentor and 21 hours of group supervision by your course instructor. This brings the field experience total requirement to 350 hours. The 329 hours of supervised experience on site will equate to an average of 23.5 hours of service per week for 14 weeks. The meeting with your university instructors and group members (if applicable) will be synchronous and, thus, scheduled for a set time each week. Please do your best to be flexible with your schedule as you, your instructor, and other group members (if applicable) try to find a time that works for each of you. During that meeting, students will have informal opportunities to share experiences at their site and give and receive feedback related to issues that arise. Students also will have opportunities to more formally present information and share experiences at their site through case presentations. Students are expected to prepare for and do two formal case presentations during the semester. As is the case in most things, the more you put into this experience, the more you will likely gain from it. Please work diligently with your site mentor to seek out experiences that will help you acquire and further develop the knowledge, awareness, and skills necessary to be effective in the human services career path that you choose.

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CNS 760: Issues in School Counseling

This course is designed to allow students to investigate current issues related to the practice of school counseling. The emphasis will be on identifying appropriate prevention responses to these issues.

Upon completion of this course, student will have the knowledge and skills outlined in the CACREP School Counseling standards copied on the last pages. The lettering and numbers in the tentative schedule refer to specific guidelines from CACREP.

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CNS 762: Issues in Clinical Mental Health

This course will examine selected issues related to clinical mental health counseling including but not limited to the following: Preparation Standards related to Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Advocacy, Crisis Intervention, Spirituality in Counseling, Ethical and Legal considerations, and Treatment Planning.

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CNS 745a: School Counseling Internship II

Internship is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and professional development. In internship, you will have opportunities to practice school counseling. Internship supervision meetings will be related to the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Activities will be designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, application of school counseling job responsibilities, self-awareness, and professional identity development.

You will take two counseling internship courses (CNS 744 and 745) that together total a minimum of 600 hours of experience in a school site and 42 hours of group supervision with your colleagues and a university supervisor. Internships are completed following the successful completion of the Counseling Practicum. Each semester’s experience includes the following:

  • 300 hours of work in a school setting over a period of one semester (an average of 21 hours per week for 14 weeks) and should include
  • 120 hours of direct service with clients and
  • 14 hours of individual supervision by the site supervisor and
  • 21 hours of group supervision (1 ½ hours/week) by program faculty with other students
  • 321 hours minimum
    Work in schools as an intern counselor and satisfactorily complete the following requirements:

  1. Complete 300 hours internship per semester (600/year) with 120 direct service clock hours each semester (24/year)
  2. Participate in all activities as requested by your site supervisor in a timely, complete manner
  3. Become familiar with and follow all state/county/school policies
  4. Maintain current professional liability insurance. Have documentation on file with the Wake counseling department.
  5. Adhere to ethical standards as outlined by the American Counseling Association and the American School Counseling Association. Read with your on-site supervisor and sign the ethical standards guidelines; submit the copy with all signatures to your program faculty.
  6. Obtain supervision from site supervisor and/or university supervisor immediately if you become aware of any information that would cause you to be concerned for anyone’s safety. Inform both supervisors without delay.

Back To Top

CNS 745b: Clinical Mental Health Internship II

The 2016 Standards of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) indicates the need for a comprehensive clinical experience in which students learn strategies to effectively provide services to a diverse population of clients. The internship provides students the opportunity to synthesize and utilize the theoretical, empirical, clinical, and professional knowledge that you have gained thus far in the program.

Internship is a highly individualized learning experience that provides opportunities for growth in skills, knowledge, and professional development. At your site, you will engage in the practice of clinical mental health counseling. Internship group supervision meetings will be based upon the needs, abilities, and concerns of the group members and supervisor. Group and individual supervision are designed to facilitate growth in specific counseling skills, case conceptualization skills, application of counselor job responsibilities, self-awareness, and professional identity development. The internship experience is intended to reflect the comprehensive work experience of a professional clinical mental health counselor. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss his or her needs and the course expectations with his/her site supervisor and university supervisor to gain the most from the internship experience.

You will complete clinical mental health counseling internship courses that together total a minimum of 600 hours of experience at a clinical mental health counseling site. During these courses, you will participate in weekly supervision at your site, as well as with your university colleagues and supervisor. Review this syllabus carefully for specifics about requirements. Remember that direct and indirect hours at your site suggest a time-based requirement, but merely completing these hours will not meet the expectations for this course; counseling students must develop clinically, professionally, and personally in order to fulfill the requirements for internship.

As a counseling student you are responsible for your own experience and learning. At this point in your training, it is expected that you engage in regular self-assessment. Thus, as part of the supervision process, you will have many opportunities to share and learn from both your struggles and your triumphs. Open communication is crucial. In fact, it is your ethical responsibility to assess your needs and ask for help when you need it. In internship, as well as across your career as a counselor, you will most certainly encounter many challenges. It is important that you bring those challenges and struggles into supervision. Consider this as you select cases and recordings to present, transcribe, and review. When it comes to asking for what you need, be courageous in your willingness to reach out for help. Your faculty, supervisors, and peers are here to help you thrive.

You are a valued member of this learning community. We look forward to learning together this semester.

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CNS 736: Appraisal Procedures

In this course, we will study the selection, use, and interpretation of tests in counseling as an adjunct to clinical impressions. More specifically, our focus will be on the appraisal, assessment, and diagnosis of personality, emotional, intellectual, and learning characteristics and disorders of clients in schools, colleges, and community human service agencies. As part of your studies, you will gain a better understanding of psychometrics, norming practices, cultural considerations, and ethical practice as these all relate to appraisal.

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CNS 765: Addiction Counseling

This course is an entry level introduction to substance abuse counseling, based on theory, research, and application. Thus, it is structured to provide the student with a broad array of information drawn from theoretical formulations, research findings and practical/clinical application. The goal for this class is to facilitate your learning by introducing you to such concepts as pharmacological issues and terminology, models of addiction, theories on etiology, diagnosis and assessment, and numerous evidence based treatment strategies.

The emphasis of the course will also be on clinical application, exploring interventions such as motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, developmental models of addiction, experiential activities, family based interventions, and 12-step self-help groups. Clinical application will be taught via small lecture, case studies, video, and role play. Usually, for any given topic conceptual and theoretical information will be presented first, followed by application via case studies, video, and triadic practice. I encourage students to be actively engaged in the learning process, and participation in mutual help groups, triads, abstinence contracts, video analysis, etc. is expected.

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CNS 790: Integrative Learning Capstone

This course, called the Capstone Course, provides an opportunity for you to pull together things you have been working on for the past 3 years. It will also help you prepare for next steps after graduation.

Unlike past courses, which often have been content heavy, this course is about you. You will have an opportunity to do several things to enhance your professional development such as creating an electronic portfolio that provides evidence of your growth as a counselor, creating a presentation that reflects that growth, and interviewing a mental health professional who has expertise in a particular field that interests you.

My hope for you is that by the end of this course, you will be prepared to enter the world of professional counseling. You are already prepared academically and clinically. The Capstone Course will give you an opportunity to create a sense of personal ownership over your accomplishments.

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CNS 766: Crisis Prevention and Response

This course will present counseling approaches which effectively address crises. The course will examine the characteristics and impact of trauma and crisis and potential neurobiological responses. Students will gain knowledge and skills useful in theory-based prevention and response models, and community-based strategies for a diverse society. Students will also explore counseling and human service contexts for application of assessment and intervention approaches in addressing specific crisis situations.

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CNS 768: Psychopharmacology for Counselors

In this course, you will learn the basic principles of psychopharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and neurobiology as they pertain to your role as a professional counselor. You will learn how psychopharmacological drugs are classified, prescribed, and managed. The information presented in this course will prepare you to function as knowledgeable members of multi-disciplinary treatment teams serving clients seeking counseling services. Finally, you will gain knowledge about the important and complex ethical and legal issues that surround the use of psychopharmacological drugs.

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CNS 767: Human Sexuality

This course is designed for counseling students whose work will bring them into contact with clients experiencing problems and concerns with their sexuality. The course is designed to develop: a.) students’ knowledge base related to human sexuality, b.) an understanding of the varied sexuality issues which may be encountered in professional counseling practice, c.) students’ skills in assessment and intervention skills with sexuality issues and d.) increased awareness of one’s personal perceptions, attitudes and affect related to sexuality issues. Course participants will become more effective in identifying, assessing and intervening with human sexuality related counseling issues.

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